Section of Film

St. Germaine Movie Night

After the Saturday Vigil Mass, St. Germaine gathers for pizza, sub-sandwiches, popcorn, and other snacks and watches a film specificaly chosen to enlighten, educate, and entertain. It's a wonderful chance to get to know other parishioners, and to enjoy the common bond Christ has formed in us.

This event was originally held to provide a bit of respite for those in grief. However, others wished to attend and the event was opened to all parishioners and guests. This has proven successful in meeting the needs of those in grief and providing a night of fun for the entire parish

The movies often have a them of redemption such as in: Captains Courageous, The Third Grader, A Smile as Big as the Moon, The Brothers, Henry Poole Was Here, and The Spitfire Girl. 'Movie Night' has proven to be successful in building our parish community, a comfort to those in grief, and an enjoyable evening for all!

Upcoming Feature Films are posted a few weeks prior in the parish bulletin and on this website. Email reminders are sent on request. Click the link below for more information, to register your email address, or to RSVP. Movie Night is sponsored by The Shepherds of Compassion. RSVPs are rquested.

Current Schedule

Date Event Time Location
21-Sep-2019 Movie Night 5:30 PM Parish Hall
19-Oct-2019 Movie Night 5:30 PM Parish Hall
16-Nov-2019 Movie Night 5:30 PM Parish Hall
18-Jan-2020 Movie Night 5:30 PM Parish Hall
21-Mar-2020 Movie Night 5:30 PM Parish Hall
23-May-2020 Movie Night 5:30 PM Parish Hall

Playing in September

Joan of Arc

Joan of Arc

Click on the inage for a larger view.

Joan of Arc, in French Jeanne d'Arc "The Maid of Orléans" (French: La Pucelle d'Orléans), is considered a heroine of France for her role during the Lancastrian phase of the Hundred Years' War, and was canonized as a Roman Catholic saint. She was born to Jacques d'Arc and Isabelle Romée, a peasant family, at Domrémy in north-east France. Joan claimed to have received visions of the Archangel Michael, Saint Margaret, and Saint Catherine of Alexandria instructing her to support Charles VII and recover France from English domination late in the Hundred Years' War. The uncrowned King Charles VII sent Joan to the siege of Orléans as part of a relief army. She gained prominence after the siege was lifted only nine days later. Several additional swift victories led to Charles VII's coronation at Reims. This long-awaited event boosted French morale and paved the way for the final French victory.

On 23 May 1430, she was captured at Compiègne by the Burgundian faction, a group of French nobles allied with the English. She was later handed over to the English and put on trial by the pro-English bishop Pierre Cauchon on a variety of charges. After Cauchon declared her guilty she was burned at the stake on 30 May 1431, dying at about nineteen years of age.

In 1456, an inquisitorial court authorized by Pope Callixtus III examined the trial, debunked the charges against her, pronounced her innocent, and declared her a martyr. In the 16th century she became a symbol of the Catholic League, and in 1803 she was declared a national symbol of France by the decision of Napoleon Bonaparte. She was beatified in 1909 and canonized in 1920. Joan of Arc is one of the nine secondary patron saints of France, along with Saint Denis, Saint Martin of Tours, Saint Louis, Saint Michael, Saint Rémi, Saint Petronilla, Saint Radegund and Saint Thérèse of Lisieux.

Joan of Arc has remained a popular figure in literature, painting, sculpture, and other cultural works since the time of her death, and many famous writers, playwrights, filmmakers, artists, and composers have created, and continue to create, cultural depictions of her. - Wikipedia